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Penalty Kick Statistics: The Numbers Behind the Shots and Saves


Penalty Kick: The Ultimate Guide to Scoring and Saving Them




A penalty kick is one of the most exciting and nerve-wracking moments in soccer. It can decide the outcome of a game, a tournament, or even a World Cup. It can make or break the reputation of a player or a team. It can be a source of joy or agony for millions of fans around the world.


But what exactly is a penalty kick, how did it come about, and what are the rules and regulations that govern it? How can you score a penalty kick every time, or save one as a goalkeeper? What are the tips and tricks that can give you an edge over your opponent?




penalty kick



In this article, we will answer all these questions and more. We will provide you with an ultimate guide to penalty kicks, covering everything from their history and evolution, to their procedure and rules, to their techniques and skills, to their psychology and mindset. We will also give you some practical advice on how to score or save them, based on statistics, research, and expert opinions.


Whether you are a player, a coach, or a fan, this article will help you understand, appreciate, and master the art of penalty kicks. So let's get started!


What is a penalty kick and when is it awarded?




A penalty kick is a method of restarting play in soccer, in which a player is allowed to take a single shot at the goal while it is defended only by the opposing team's goalkeeper. It is awarded when an offence punishable by a direct free kick is committed by a player in their own penalty area.


The penalty area is a marked region of the pitch extending 16.5 metres (18 yards) out from each goalpost, and 16.5 metres in depth. The penalty spot is located 11 metres (12 yards) from the goal line and centred between the touch lines.


The offences that can result in a penalty being awarded include:



  • Deliberately touching the ball with a hand or arm (other than the goalkeeper)



  • Careless, reckless, or excessive use of force to charge, jump, kick, challenge, push, strike, or tackle an attacking player



  • Holding, pushing, or impeding an opponent



  • Spitting at or biting an opponent or official



  • Throwing something at the ball, opponent, or official, or hitting an object with the ball



The referee is the sole authority to decide whether a foul has occurred and whether it warrants a penalty. The referee may also consult with their assistant referees or use video assistant referee (VAR) technology to review their decision.


The history and evolution of the penalty kick rule




<p The procedure and rules of taking a penalty kick




The procedure and rules of taking a penalty kick are specified in Law 14 of the Laws of the Game, which is the official document that governs the sport of soccer. The following are the main points to remember when taking a penalty kick:


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How to save a penalty kick as a goalkeeper


How to block a penalty kick as a defender


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How to avoid a penalty kick as an opponent


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How to cope with a missed penalty kick as a player


How to react to a missed penalty kick as a coach


How to deal with a missed penalty kick as a fan


How to predict a penalty kick as a spectator


How to bet on a penalty kick as a gambler


How to measure a penalty kick distance and angle


How to mark a penalty kick spot and area


How to place a penalty kick ball and run-up


How to choose a penalty kick side and corner


How to vary a penalty kick speed and curve


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How to defend against a penalty kick trick or deception


How to review a penalty kick decision or outcome


How to improve your penalty kick conversion rate



  • The ball must be stationary on the penalty mark, which is 11 metres (12 yards) from the goal line and centred between the touch lines.



  • The player taking the penalty kick must be clearly identified to the referee.



  • Only the kicker and the defending team's goalkeeper are allowed to be within the penalty area; all other players must be within the field of play, outside the penalty area, behind the penalty mark, and a minimum of 9.15 metres (10 yards) from the penalty mark. This distance is denoted by the penalty arc.



  • The goalkeeper must remain on the goal line, facing the kicker, between the goalposts, until the ball is kicked. The goalkeeper must not touch the goalposts, crossbar, or goal net, or behave in a way that unfairly distracts or influences the kicker.



  • The referee blows the whistle to indicate that the penalty kick may be taken.



  • The kicker may make feinting (deceptive or distracting) movements during the run-up to the ball, but may not do so once the run-up is completed. The kick and the last step the kicker takes must be in motion.



  • The ball must be kicked forward. Backheeling is permitted provided the ball moves forward.



  • The ball is in play once it is kicked and moves, and at that time other players may enter the penalty area and the penalty arc.



  • The kicker may not touch the ball a second time until it has been touched by another player of either team or goes out of play (including into the goal).



If any of these rules are violated by either team, the referee may stop play and take appropriate action, depending on who committed the offence and whether it affected the outcome of the kick. The possible actions include retaking the kick, awarding a goal, restarting with an indirect free kick, cautioning or sending off a player, or ending the game.


The common infringements and consequences of a penalty kick




Some of the common infringements and consequences of a penalty kick are as follows:



InfringementConsequence


The player taking the penalty kick or a team-mate offends before the ball is in playIf the ball enters the goal, the kick is retaken. If the ball does not enter the goal, play is stopped and restarted with an indirect free kick for the defending team. The offending player may also be cautioned for unsporting behaviour if they feinted at kicking after completing their run-up.


The goalkeeper offends before the ball is in playIf the ball enters the goal, a goal is awarded. If the ball does not enter the goal, play continues unless there was an infringement by both teams. If there was an infringement by both teams or if play was stopped for another reason before a goal was scored or missed, then it is retaken. The goalkeeper may also be cautioned for unsporting behaviour if they moved off their line before or during their opponent's run-up.


A player of either team who is required to be outside or at least 9.15 m (10 yds) from the penalty mark enters these areas before or after the referee signals for the penalty kick to be takenIf this has no impact on play (including if the ball rebounds into play from the goalkeeper), play continues. If this has an impact on play: - if a member of both teams infringes this Law, the kick is retaken unless a player commits a more serious offence (e.g. illegal feinting) - if only one player enters these areas, the referee allows play to continue if that player does not interfere with play; if that player interferes with play or if there is an offence by both teams: - if this occurs before - if this occurs after - if this occurs after - if this occurs after - if this occurs after - if this occurs after - if this occurs after - if this occurs after the ball is in play, the referee blows their whistle, stops play and restarts with an indirect free kick; if this occurs after the ball is in play, play continues unless there was an infringement by both teams. If there was an infringement by both teams or if play was stopped for another reason before a goal was scored or missed, then it is retaken. The offending player may also be cautioned for unsporting behaviour if they clearly obstructed the goalkeeper's line of vision or movement, or if they made a gesture or movement which, in the opinion of the referee, deceived or distracted an opponent.


The kicker touches the ball a second time before it has touched another playerIf the ball enters the goal, play is stopped and restarted with an indirect free kick for the defen


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